Food Bites: Feb 2018

FOOD BITES: JUNE 2018

Vegetables Harvested in Antarctica Without Sun, Soil or Pesticides

Scientists in Antarctica have harvested the first crop of vegetables grown without soil, daylight or pesticides as part of a project designed to help astronauts cultivate fresh food on other planets. Researchers at Germany’s Neumayer Station III say eight pounds of salad greens, 18 cucumbers and 70 radishes....

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FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

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FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

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FOOD BITES: FEBRUARY 2018

Food Safety Tips for People with Diabetes

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now has available a free booklet called “Food Safety for People with Diabetes.” Practicing food safety is critical for people who have diabetes, the FDA says, because diabetes can affect the function of various organs and systems of the body, making people living with this disease more susceptible to infections and pathogens that cause food-borne illness. When people with diabetes contract a foodborne illness (food poisoning), they are more likely to have a lengthier illness, undergo hospitalization or even die. The booklet covers subjects such as handling and preparing food safely, cold storage, food product dating and symptoms of food poisoning. Go to www.fda.gov to download the booklet. (Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration)


WHO Urges End of Antibiotics in Animals

The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has spurred the World Health Organization (WHO) to update its guidelines for the use of antibiotics in animals used for human food. The WHO recommendations aim to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics used to treat infections in humans. “Over-use and misuse of antibiotics in animals and humans is contributing to the rising threat of antibiotic resistance,” the WHO said in a news release. “Some types of bacteria that cause serious infections in humans have already developed resistance to most or all of the available treatments, and there are very few promising options

in the research pipeline.” Scientific evidence shows overuse of antibiotics in animals, including the common practice of using them to promote growth, contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistance, says Dr. Kazuaki Miyagishima, WHO director of the Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses. The food industry uses 80 percent of medically important antibiotics on animals. (Source: Food Safety News)


Try a Sugar Detox

Reducing sugar in your diet can help you drop pounds, improve your health and even give you more radiant skin. Sugar not only keeps us overweight, it is also a leading cause of heart disease and leads to premature aging, according to Brooke Alpert, a registered dietitian and co-author of The Sugar Detox: Lose the Sugar, Lose the Weight – Look and Feel Great. People are addicted to sugar, Alpert says. Research suggests sugar induces rewards and cravings similar in magnitude to those induced by addictive drugs. To break free of this addiction to sugar, going cold turkey works best, at least in the beginning. Try eating proteins (chicken or fish), vegetables and healthy fats. Drink water, unsweetened tea and black coffee. Depending on how intense your addiction is, Alpert says, you may

experience withdrawal symptoms, such as brain fog, crankiness and fatigue. “If you feel bad, stop and have a piece of fruit. But if you can push through and stay well-hydrated, you can really break your cycle of sugar addiction,” she said. A sugar detox may not be appropriate for people with diabetes, extreme athletes or anyone taking medication to control blood sugar. It is also not recommended for pregnant women. (Source: CNN News)

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

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