FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2021

3D Food Printing On the Horizon


An interesting development in food technology is the work of institutes that are creating a means of 3D printing food. The technology will work by building the end product layer by minute layer. This solution will offer endless possibilities for the shape, texture, composition and, ultimately, taste of food products in the future. 3D printing will let you customize the final dish to your specific demands and tastes. Researchers believe this technology will be popular with food producers, retailers and consumers alike. In addition, 3D printing will greatly reduce the waste produced from conventional cooking and could be used to promote healthy high-tech food. Once the technology is refined, it will provide unlimited possibilities for novel food designs by manipulating the ratio of ingredients to its final physical form on the plate.


Source: Interesting Engineering (www.interestingengineering.com)


Insect Protein Could Replace Meat


The burgeoning insect-protein industry want bugs to become as common as beef, chicken and pork – and maybe even replace them. Although it might seem unpalatable to eat insects in their natural form, they can easily be ground up and used to replace other protein in various recipes. Insect protein contains about 60 protein, is packed with vitamin B12

and has more calcium than milk. It also has more iron than spinach and can supply you with all the essential amino acids your body needs. If insect protein’s popularity continues to grow, it could spark an entirely new industry and create hundreds, if not thousands, of jobs.


Source: Interesting Engineering (www.interestingengineering.com)


Food Scraps Become Construction Material


Japanese researchers at the University of Tokyo are demonstrating how scraps from fruits and vegetables can be made into durable building products. They have discovered how to turn food waste into robust construction materials. Vacuum-dried, pulverized seaweed, cabbage leaves and orange, onion, pumpkin and banana peels were used to make materials that were at least as strong as concrete. The researchers used a process called heat pressing, which is used to make construction materials from wood powder. But instead of pulverized wood, they used pulverized food scraps. They mixed the food powder with water and seasonings, then pressed the mixture into a mold. They “baked” it at a high

temperature, then tested the bending strength of the resulting materials. Kota Machida, a senior collaborator on the project, said all the resulting materials except the pumpkin-based specimens exceeded their bending strength target. In addition, they found Chinese cabbage leaves produced a construction material that was more than three times stronger than concrete. The materials also resisted rot, fungi and insects. Food waste is a global financial burden and environmental concern. It’s estimated that 30 percent to 40 percent of the food produced worldwide is wasted each year. Reusing food scraps in building materials could go a long way toward alleviating this growing problem.


Source: Food Science News (www.foodscience.news)

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.