HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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between the ages of 75-84 years for 16 years.


The researchers found the protective association between the flu vaccine and the risk of Alzheimer’s was strongest for those who received their first vaccine at a younger age – for example, the people who received their first documented flu shot at age 60 benefitted more than those who received their first flu shot at age 70.


“Our study suggests that regular use of a very accessible and relatively cheap intervention – the flu shot – may significantly reduce risk of Alzheimer’s dementia,” Amran said. “More research is needed to explore the biological mechanism for this effect – why and how it works in the body – which is important as we explore effective preventive therapies for Alzheimer’s.”


Pneumonia Vaccine May Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk Later in Life


Repurposing existing vaccines may be a promising approach to Alzheimer’s disease prevention. Svetlana Ukraintseva, Ph.D., associate research professor in the Biodemography of Aging Research Unit (BARU) at Duke University Social Science Research Institute, and her team investigated associations between pneumococcal vaccination, with and without an accompanying seasonal flu shot, and the risk of Alzheimer’s disease among 5,146 participants age 65 years and older from the Cardiovascular Health Study. The team also took into account a known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s – the rs2075650 G allele in the TOMM40 gene.


The researchers found getting a pneumococcal vaccination between ages 65-75 years reduced the risk of developing Alzheimer’s by 25 percent to 30 percent after adjusting for sex, race, birth cohort, education, smoking and number of G alleles. The largest reduction in the risk of Alzheimer’s (up to 40 percent) was observed among people vaccinated against pneumonia who were non-carriers of the risk gene. Total number of vaccinations against pneumonia and the flu between ages 65 and 75 years was also associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s; however, the effect was not evident for the flu shot alone.


“Vaccinations against pneumonia before age 75 may reduce Alzheimer’s risk later in life, depending on individual genotype,” Ukraintseva said. “These data suggest that pneumococcal vaccine may be a promising candidate for personalized Alzheimer’s prevention, particularly in non-carriers of certain risk genes.”


The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to lead the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection and maximizing top-quality care and support. Visit www.alz.org or call 1-800-272-3900.

FLU & PHEUMONIA VACCINATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED RISK OF ALZHEIMERS DISEASE

dementias,” Carrillo said. “This research, while early, calls for further studies in large, diverse clinical trials to inform whether vaccinations as a public health strategy decrease our risk for developing dementia as we age.”


Seasonal Flu Vaccine May Reduce Incidence of Alzheimer’s Dementia


Previous research has suggested vaccinations may have a protective factor against cognitive decline, but there have been no large, comprehensive studies focused on the influenza (flu) vaccine and Alzheimer’s disease risk specifically. To address this gap, Albert Amran, a medical student at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and his team investigated a large American health record dataset (n=9,066).


Amran and his team found having one flu vaccination was associated with a lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s (odds ratio 0.83, p<0.0001), and among vaccinated patients, receiving the flu vaccine more frequently was associated with an even lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s (odds ratio 0.87, p=0.0342). Thus, people that consistently got their annual flu shot had a lower risk of Alzheimer’s. This translated to an almost 6-percent reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease for patients

International Conference Reports Findings of Research Studies


Three research studies reported at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® 2020 suggest:



“With the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines are at the forefront of public health discussions. It is important to explore their benefit in not only protecting against viral or bacterial infection but also improving long-term health outcomes,” said Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer.


“It may turn out to be as simple as if you’re taking care of your health in this way – getting vaccinated – you’re also taking care of yourself in other ways, and these things add up to lower risk of Alzheimer’s and