IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN ORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH

Mental health is linked to oral health, and vice versa. Good oral health can enhance mental and overall health, while poor oral health can exacerbate mental issues. Likewise, mental conditions can cause oral health issues. The connection between them is direct, cyclical and, when oral health is neglected, detrimental.

….FULL ARTICLE

DIABETES AND YOUR TEETH

Diabetes may cause serious problems with keeping your mouth healthy and having an attractive smile. The disease causes difficulties in the mouth, and problems in the mouth may cause trouble with diabetes. With diabetes, glucose is present in the saliva. When diabetes is not controlled, increased glucose in the saliva allows harmful bacteria to grow.   Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is the most widespread chronic inflammatory condition worldwide, says Dr. Wayne Aldredge.

….FULL ARTICLE

SMART APPS FOR DENTAL HEALTH CARE

Oral health is often taken for granted. The mouth is a window into the health of the entire body. It can show signs of nutritional deficiencies or general infection. Systemic diseases – those that affect the entire body – may first become apparent because of mouth lesions or other oral problems.   Regardless of age, oral health is very important. Positive oral health leads to improved overall health. More Americans today are keeping their natural teeth throughout their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

grains. Be sure to read the ingredi- ent list on the foods you buy at the grocery store. Some “clean” processed foods include yogurt, cheese and whole wheat pasta.


Limit sugar intake.

The majority of Americans consume more than the daily recommended amount of sugar. Sugars can be found in almost everything; however, added sugars should be avoided. Try cutting out sodas, candy and baked goods. When you are shopping, look for foods that do not have sugar as an ingredient.

Many people ask what “eating clean” means. This common question has a simple answer. Eating clean is eating foods that are natural and healthy instead of unhealthy, processed foods. It means trying to embrace more whole foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains as well as healthy proteins and fats. The Mayo Clinic describes eating clean as a way of living that lends itself to improving your health and well being.


Eating clean is not an easy task. There are so many temptations on a daily basis at your job, grocery store and celebratory events. Try to find healthy alternatives and focus on fresh, natural ingredients. Eating clean is not always realistic for every meal, but here are five simple steps you can take to begin making healthier choices and start your eating-clean journey:


Purchase fresh produce.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 76 percent of Americans do not consume the daily recommended amount of fruits and 87 percent do not consume the daily recommended amount of vegetables. Eating fresh produce can help lower the risk of many chronic diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. Try to purchase fresh produce from the local famer’s market or even try growing your own. Fresh produce is more likely to be organic and have higher nutritional value.

EATING CLEAN IMPROVES HEALTH AND WELL BEING

TANIQUA WARD, M.S.

TaNiqua Ward is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by taniqua ward

Eat whole grains.

The best whole grains to consume are those that require the least amount of processing. Whole grains have all the parts of the original kernel, including bran, germ and endosperm in their original proportions, according to registered dietician Keri Gans. Whole grains are known to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and they help with digestion because of their high fiber content. Some examples of healthy whole grain options include brown rice, quinoa and oatmeal.


Eat less meat.

Research is starting to find eating less meat can be healthy for you. You do not have to become a vegan and cut out animal products completely, but reducing meat consumption can have many health benefits. It can help lower your blood pressure, reduce your chances of heart disease and help you lose weight. Try eating grassfeed beef and wild-caught salmon instead of cold cuts and bacon.


Avoid processed foods.

We all know processed foods are convenient and easily accessible. However, it is best to avoid these foods because of their high content of sugar and refined