VIGILANCE FOR BRAIN CANCER

Brain cancer is a very serious form of cancer. Recently, Sen. John McCain revealed he has been diagnosed with a primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – the most aggressive type of brain tumor. GBMs originate in the brain; it does not spread there from another part of the body. The cause is not known. This tumor has no relation to melanoma, the skin cancer for which McCain was treated in the past.

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QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY

Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for cancer. It kills healthy cells along with cancer cells, inflicting damage on the body and seriously compromising the immune system. Chemotherapy also kills most rapidly dividing healthy and cancer cells, but not all the cells are fast growing. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cancer cells that are slow growing and thus resistant to treatment, do not die. Chemotherapy makes these cells even more numerous as the ratio of highly malignant cells….

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RESTORING DIGNITY AND ’DOS

For many women facing cancer, the most devastating aspect is learning they may lose their hair due to chemotherapy.  “Most women tell me that as soon as they hear the oncologist say, ‘You’re going to lose your hair,’ that’s the last thing they remember hearing,” said Eric Johnson, co-owner, with his wife, Jeletta, of Hair Institute in Lexington. “They can deal with the sickness; they can deal with the treatments; but it’s the hair loss that gets them the most.

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grains. Be sure to read the ingredi- ent list on the foods you buy at the grocery store. Some “clean” processed foods include yogurt, cheese and whole wheat pasta.


Limit sugar intake.

The majority of Americans consume more than the daily recommended amount of sugar. Sugars can be found in almost everything; however, added sugars should be avoided. Try cutting out sodas, candy and baked goods. When you are shopping, look for foods that do not have sugar as an ingredient.

Many people ask what “eating clean” means. This common question has a simple answer. Eating clean is eating foods that are natural and healthy instead of unhealthy, processed foods. It means trying to embrace more whole foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains as well as healthy proteins and fats. The Mayo Clinic describes eating clean as a way of living that lends itself to improving your health and well being.


Eating clean is not an easy task. There are so many temptations on a daily basis at your job, grocery store and celebratory events. Try to find healthy alternatives and focus on fresh, natural ingredients. Eating clean is not always realistic for every meal, but here are five simple steps you can take to begin making healthier choices and start your eating-clean journey:


Purchase fresh produce.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 76 percent of Americans do not consume the daily recommended amount of fruits and 87 percent do not consume the daily recommended amount of vegetables. Eating fresh produce can help lower the risk of many chronic diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. Try to purchase fresh produce from the local famer’s market or even try growing your own. Fresh produce is more likely to be organic and have higher nutritional value.

EATING CLEAN IMPROVES HEALTH AND WELL BEING

TANIQUA WARD, M.S.

TaNiqua Ward is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by taniqua ward

Eat whole grains.

The best whole grains to consume are those that require the least amount of processing. Whole grains have all the parts of the original kernel, including bran, germ and endosperm in their original proportions, according to registered dietician Keri Gans. Whole grains are known to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and they help with digestion because of their high fiber content. Some examples of healthy whole grain options include brown rice, quinoa and oatmeal.


Eat less meat.

Research is starting to find eating less meat can be healthy for you. You do not have to become a vegan and cut out animal products completely, but reducing meat consumption can have many health benefits. It can help lower your blood pressure, reduce your chances of heart disease and help you lose weight. Try eating grassfeed beef and wild-caught salmon instead of cold cuts and bacon.


Avoid processed foods.

We all know processed foods are convenient and easily accessible. However, it is best to avoid these foods because of their high content of sugar and refined