HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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DYSLEXIA: CEREBELLUM NOT INVOLVED IN READING

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

reading process were not communicating with the cerebellum in children with or without dyslexia while the brain was processing words.”


The results revealed that when reading was not considered in the analysis but rather the communications between brain regions at rest, the cerebellum was communicating with the cortex more strongly in the children with dyslexia. “These differences are consistent with the widely distributed neurobiological alterations that are associated with dyslexia, but not all of them are likely to be casual to the reading difficulties,” Ashburn said.


Treatment approaches targeting the cerebellum, like standing on a wobble board, won’t improve a child’s reading skills, according to the researchers. They further stress these types of treatments are a waste of money and divert from other treatment approaches that include structured intervention for reading difficulties involving the learning of phonologic and orthographic processing.


The study was published in the journal Human Brain Mapping on Oct. 9.

Deficits in the process of phonological awareness occurs in the left cortex regions of the brain. Some argue the difficulties in phonological processing originate in the cerebellum. Dr. Harold N. Levinson, a psychiatrist and neurologist, developed the cerebellar deficit hypothesis in the early 1970s. The cerebellum is considered to be involved in motor function, and Levinson attributed dyslexia to inner-ear problems and infections that impede cerebellar processing. Treatment for dyslexia differs greatly between this hypothesis and the standardly accepted views of why and how dyslexia occurs.


In October, neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center disproved the cerebellar deficit theory with brain imaging research. The imaging shows the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia.


Prior imaging research on reading in dyslexia had not found much support for the cerebellum deficit hypothesis. Those studies focused on the cortex, says lead author Sikoya Ashburn, which is why these neuroscientists decided to directly address this theory and examine the cerebellum in more detail. They found no signs of cerebellar involvement during reading in skilled readers, nor differences in children with reading disabilities. “Functional connectivity occurs when two brain regions behave similarly over time; they operate in sync,” Ashburn said. “However, brain regions in the cortex known to partake in the