HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Lack of physical activity. People who exercise regularly have better heart health. Being active contributes to lower blood pressure.


Stress. The way you respond to stress can increase your risk of a heart attack.


Alcohol. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure and increase your risk for cardiomyopathy, stroke, cancer and other diseases.


Talk to your doctor if you or a member of your family shows any signs of early heart disease. Early detection and treatment can save lives. Don’t disregard the signs of a heart attack, no matter how unlikely it seems to be. Call your local emergency number or 911 right away. Every minute counts. Paramedics can begin treatment when they arrive — much sooner than if someone drove you to the hospital. They are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. The sooner you get to an emergency room, the sooner you can get treatment to reduce the amount of damage to the heart muscle.


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About the Author:  Peggy Lord, M.A., is a retired educator, both in the public schools and as a professor of education.   

A heart attack is a medical emergency. It is a circulation problem that occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked by a clot, starving the heart of oxygen and nutrients. Without blood, tissue loses oxygen and dies. This can damage your heart or lead to an abnormal heart rhythm or heart failure. The heart usually does not stop beating during a heart attack, but the longer the person goes without treatment, the greater the damage to the heart. It is important for everyone to learn the signs of a heart attack.


Heart attack signs can vary. The classic scenario is experiencing crushing chest pain, but women are more likely to have no chest pain at all when they have heart attacks. That’s why it’s so important to know your own risk factors for a heart attack, said Paul A. Jones, MD, FACP, FACC, medical director for Franciscan Health Cardiovascular Services in Northern Indiana and South Suburban Chicago. “The better we educate the public on knowing the risk factors, the higher the likelihood they would be more in tune to some of the potential signs and symptoms of a heart attack,” he said.


Heart attack risk factors include:


Age. Men age 45 years or older and women age 55 years or older are more likely to have a heart attack than younger men and women.



DO YOU KNOW THE SIGNS OF A HEART ATTACK?

Tobacco Use. This includes not only smoking but long-term exposure to secondhand smoke.


High blood pressure. Over time, high blood pressure can damage the arteries that lead to your heart.


High blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels. As your blood cholesterol rises, so does your risk of coronary heart disease. When other risk factors such as high blood pressure and tobacco smoke are also present, the risk increases even more.


Obesity. People who have excess body fat – especially if much of it is concentrated at the waist – are more likely to develop heart disease and stroke, even if they have no other risk factors. Losing just 10 percent of your body weight can improve this factor.


Diabetes. Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, even if glucose levels are under control. If blood sugar is not under control, the risks are even greater.