DESIGNING A HEALTHY DIET FOR THE NEW YEAR

Every year, millions of Americans make New Year’s resolutions. The majority of these resolutions focus on diet in attempts to lose weight and be healthier. A new year is the perfect time to jumpstart a healthy diet to make the changes you want to see for yourself throughout the year. However, research shows 80 percent of resolutions fail by February. Many people strive for unrealistic goals, which ultimately set them up for failure.

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EXERCISE HAS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON THE BRAIN

While exercise has long been known for its positive effects on physical health and its ability to heighten energy and help manage chronic health problems such as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, exercise is now being lauded for its beneficial effects on the brain.   These benefits touch almost every aspect of life. Exercise helps sharpen short-term memory and improve long-term memory. This happens because exercise can reduce insulin resistance and inflammation and stimulate….

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GETTING STARTED AND STICKING WITH IT

As we kick off 2018, you may be thinking about resolutions pertaining to your health and fitness. It’s easy to determine some ways to improve your physical, mental and emotional well-being. However, it’s not always as simple to stay motivated and make the new commitments part of your lifestyle. Now is the perfect time to set goals, whether it be for the number of days you intend to work out each week, how many steps you want to take each day or healthy meals you want to prepare for your family.

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When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” it displays letters of progressively smaller size. Normal vision is 20/20. This means someone sees the same line of letters at 20 feet that a normal person sees at 20 feet. If you have 20/100 vision, it means you must be as close as 20 feet to see what a person with normal vision can see at 100 feet.


A comprehensive eye examination performed by an eye specialist can diagnose issues affecting someone’s ability to see well. An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor that specializes in the eye. While the training of ophthalmologists and optometrists is now very similar, especially with ocular disease diagnosis and treatment, there are some marked differences between the two. Ophthalmologists are trained to perform surgery. This includes LASIK vision correction as well as cataract removal and surgery related to eye trauma, burns or detachment of the retina. Ophthalmologists have additional specialized training in diagnosing and treating more complex medical eye

DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

conditions. It is not unusual for optometrists and ophthalmologists to work closely together on hard-to-diagnose conditions or ongoing disease treatment and management.


Opticians have a different role and responsibility. They specialize in filling the lens prescriptions optometrists and ophthalmologists prescribe. Opticians will usually receive a one- or two-year degree or certification. In a typical optometry practice, the optician will evaluate the prescriptions written by the eye doctor and dispense, repair, adjust and replace eyeglass frames, lenses and contacts.


Children, adolescents and adults all need an annual eye exam. An eye care specialist is prepared to diagnose, treat and assist you. If you are dealing with aging eyes, it is critical to have regular eye exams to diagnose and treat serious eye conditions and assess overall health. The eyes can play a critical role in early diagnosis of other conditions and diseases.


Sources and Resources


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller