HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

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10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

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FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

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disease in which the body mistakenly attacks the pancreatic cells thatmake insulin. It affects about 5 percent of all people with diabetes.


According to the CDC, diabetes and its related complications rack up $245 billion in medical costs, lost work and wages, up from $174 billion in 2010.


Similarly, more than 3 million people in the United Kingdom are being treated for diabetes, an increase of nearly 60 percent in the past 10 years. According to the charity Diabetes UK, the figures show the majority there also have Type 2 diabetes.


Dr. Joan St John, a GP in Brent in northwest London, where diabetes levels are some of the highest in the country, said the condition had become incredibly widespread. She told the BBC News Web site, “It’s very noticeable in that not a week goes by that you don’t make a new diagnosis of diabetes, at least one if not two or three; previously that might have been one a month.”

Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It is partly due to a lack of exercise and sugary diets. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes kills more than 71,000 people a year. If the current state continues, one in three Americans will have diabetes by the year 2050. The condition over time can lead to limb amputations, blindness and kidney failure, among many other complications.


Over 29 million American adults have diabetes. And a quarter of them don’t even know it. That’s up from 26 million in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and represents more than 9 percent of the population.


According to Ann Albright, director of the division of diabetes translation at the CDC, these new numbers are alarming and underscore the need for an increased focus on reducing the burden of diabetes in this country. The CDC makes its estimates based on a national sample of Americans who are asked whether they have been diagnosed with diabetes and give blood samples. They are not asked specifically what type of diabetes they have, but the vast majority have Type 2 diabetes, which is often caused by poor diet and lack of exercise.


Type 1 diabetes, usually diagnosed in childhood, is an autoimmune

DIABETES IS ON THE RISE

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh