A LOOK AT WEIGHT-LOSS MEDICATIONS

For most people, losing weight is a challenge that requires them to make lifestyle changes. They must focus on diet and exercise, reducing caloric intake while increasing physical activity. It is best to follow a low-carbohydrate diet that emphasizes eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables and eschews sugar and processed foods.  However, for many people, no matter what they do, the weight just doesn’t drop off as they hope. They need a little more help in the form of medications specifically designed to stave off obesity.

….FULL ARTICLE

OVARIAN CYSTS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

An ovarian cyst is a sac filled with fluid or semisolid material that forms on or within an ovary. These cysts are highly common, especially during the childbearing years. According to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ovarian cysts are less common after menopause; however, postmenopausal women who have an ovarian cyst are at higher risk for developing ovarian cancer. In most cases, cysts are harmless and typically go away on their own.

….FULL ARTICLE

MALE INFERTILITY

Creating a baby is no small feat. Many conditions, both in the woman and the man, have to be just right for pregnancy to occur. According to the Mayo Clinic, (www.mayoclinic.org), up to 15 percent of couples are infertile. They have not conceived a child even though they have had frequent, unprotected sexual intercourse for a year or longer. In up to half of these couples, male infertility is a significant factor.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Family Doc Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FAMILY DOC ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

Cold sores, also known as fever blisters, are often a winter inevitability. They are caused by the oral form of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). The virus is highly contagious. According to one source, about 67 percent of the world’s population younger than 50 years old has HSV-1. Most people contract it in early childhood; it is transmitted through skin-to-skin contact. Once you are infected with it, the virus never leaves your body. Fortunately for most people, the virus remains inactive throughout their lives.


However, when the virus does wake up, cold sores may appear as red bumps or blisters on the gums and the outside of the mouth, lips and nose. You may also develop a fever or a sore throat or have swollen lymph nodes. The factors that trigger cold sores include stress, cold weather and fatigue. They usually last seven to 10 days. They are very contagious during this time period. The virus can spread from the mouth to the genitals, eyes and other parts of the body. Your doctor may examine the cold sore or take a culture from it or take a blood sample to test for antibodies.


There is no cure for cold sores. Most of the time they disappear on their own. You can ease the pain by taking ibuprofen, acetaminophen or vitamin C, applying ice and using over-the-counter numbing medicines. These medicines may reduce the duration of cold sores.

Your doctor may prescribe an anti-viral oral medication to facilitate healing. It is also a good idea to avoid spicy and acidic foods such as citrus fruits while the cold sores are active.


To prevent cold sores, be sure to:


•  wash your hands after you touch a cold sore;

•  replace your toothbrush;

•  avoid kissing someone who has a cold sore and don’t kiss anyone else when you have one;

•  use sunscreen; and

•  replace your lipstick or lip balm.


Don’t share toothbrushes, razors, water bottles, drinking glasses and silverware with someone who has a cold sore. Your best bet for avoiding cold sores is to stay healthy. A fever can trigger a cold sore outbreak, so you need to make sure you combat illness and strengthen your immunity by getting enough sleep

DEALING WITH COLD SORES

and exercise, eating healthily and staying hydrated. Hydration protects your lips from the dry air that comes with being inside during the winter. It may be a good idea to get a humidifier for your home. In addition, use products that will guard your lips against chapping caused by the wind and sunlight (even in the wintertime, the sun’s rays can cause damage). Soothe a sore mouth with a rinse that contains baking soda. Dress in layers to protect your body when it’s cold, including wearing hats and scarves.


If you do develop a cold sore, keep it clean by washing it gently with soap and water. It can become more serious if it leads to a bacterial infection, especially in people who have weakened or impaired immune systems.

DR. WESLEY W. JOHNSON

Dr. Wesley W. Johnson completed his family practice residency at the University of Kentucky in November 2004, joining Family Practice Associates of Lexington in December 2004. Dr. Johnson’s particular interests include chronic disease management, pediatrics and aviation medicine.

more articles by dr Johnson