PAP SMEAR: TEST LOOKS FOR PRESENCE OF PRECANCEROUS CELLS

A Pap smear is a procedure that screens for cervical cancer. Most women should start getting Pap smears at age 21 years and every three years after. It should be a part of your annual physical exam. The test looks for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix, the opening of the uterus or womb. During the procedure, cells from the cervix are scraped away. It is not painful and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. You may bleed a little after the test is completed.

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WHAT IS A MEDICARE WELLNESS EXAM?

A Medicare Wellness Exam is a preventative screening visit your provider wants you to have once a year. This visit is free and is separate from your annual physical exam (if your plan covers annual physicals). Traditional Medicare does not pay for a physical – it only covers a Wellness Exam.  What is a Wellness Exam? The visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since your last visit). It is designed to help prevent disease and disability based on your current health....

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ORAL HERPES

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, ….

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DEALING WITH AN ADHD CHILD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder that affects 11 percent of school- age children, according to Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (www.chadd.org). The current consensus says it is due to differences in brain development and brain activity in these children. Children diagnosed with ADHD show signs such as being inattentive or easily distracted; having trouble focusing their attention; and having difficulty concentrating and staying on task. Hyperactive children are often fidgety and restless, having trouble sitting still or being quiet. They climb, roughhouse, jump and run around at inappropriate times. They can often be disruptive without meaning to. Children with ADHD are also impulsive and lack self control, acting before thinking, often in risky ways. They interrupt others and find it hard to wait their turn. Their emotional reactions are sometimes over the top; they can get distressed about situations other children take in stride and have intense outbursts due to low frustration tolerance.


Being the parent of a child with ADHD can leave you feeling overwhelmed and stressed out. You can and should rely on your primary care physician to help you cope. First of all, it is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis. Children are often distracted and inattentive or fidgety and disruptive, but this does not always mean a child has ADHD. Your physician will start the investigative process by asking you certain questions: How is the child doing in school?

Have the child’s teachers told you about possible learning problems they have observed? Does your child enjoy school? Is he having trouble completing class work or homework? Are there any behavior problems either at school or at home that concern you?


Besides asking questions, your physician will give your child a thorough physical check-up to rule out any other problems – such as with their hearing or vision – that could be causing the suspect symptoms.


Your physician can guide you to resources, such as places where your child can be properly tested and diagnosed or to a child psychologist or psychiatrist if necessary. If the testing shows your child has ADHD, your physician can then help you find places where he can be helped – and where you can get support as well. You will find it very useful to commiserate with people who are in the same boat as you. Other parents can share ideas and tactics that have worked for their child and that might work for yours as well.


When a treatment plan is set up, be sure to let your physician know what it

entails. It is especially important for the doctor to know what, if any, medication has been prescribed. The physician will also want to know about any behavioral therapy the child will be receiving and what parenting approaches you are trying. He or she will want to make sure you are doing all right and are staying healthy and focused in the face of this daunting challenge. ADHD is often inherited, so you may want to get tested yourself.

DR. DIANA C. HAYSLIP

Dr. Hayslip is a native of Ohio. She joined Family Practice Associates of Lexington in 2007. Dr. Hayslip’s goal as your family physician is to “help you feel better and stay healthy.”

more articles by Dr. Diana C. Hayslip