EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT - KENTUCKY HEALTH SOLUTIONS

It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

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DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

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Better understanding of the type of depression a person experiences couldi mprove the effectiveness of treatment choices and the management of depressive symptoms. Depression is typically diagnosed based on verbalized symptoms patients experience. This relates to the way the symptoms are assessed and the accuracy of patient reporting.


Conor Liston, M.D., a professor of neuroscience and psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, reports his research team, using brain scans, has identified four unique subtypes of clinical depression based on distinct patterns of abnormal brain connectivity. Their findings appear currently in Nature Medicine (December 2016).


“The four subtypes of depression that we discovered vary in terms of their clinical symptoms but, more importantly, they differ in their responses to treatment,” said Liston. For psychiatric care and treatment, using brain scans may assist mental health professionals in understanding the nature of a patient’s depression.


This collaborative study included 1,180 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans of patients with clinical depression and healthy controls from across the country. Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine and seven other institutions analyzed the scans and identified biomarkers linked with depression by assigning statistical weights

CURRENT RESEARCH REVEALS FOUR DEPRESSION SUBTYPES

to abnormal brain connections. They then predicted the probability the abnormal connections belonged to a particular subtype versus another. The study showed distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain differentiated among the four subtypes and were linked with specific symptoms. Reduced connectivity in the brain region that regulates fear-related behavior and reappraisal of negative emotional stimuli, for example, was most severe in two of the four subtypes, which demonstrated increased anxiety. The researchers believe their findings may be useful for identifying patients most likely to benefit from targeted neuro-stimulation therapies. In the past, efforts to characterize depression by looking at groups of verbalized symptoms that tend to co-occur and then testing neurophysiological links have produced inconsistent results.


Sources and Resources:


•  Drysdale, A.T., Grosenick, L., Downar, J., et al. (2016) Resting-state connectivity biomarkers define neurophysiological subtypes of depression. Nature Medicine, 2016 December 5.

•  Neuroimaging categorizes for depression subtypes. Weill Cornell Medicine press release, Dec. 5, 2016.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller