FEMALE INFERTILITY HAS MANY FACTORS

Infertility means being unable to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or six months if the woman is over age 35). Infertility results from female factors about one-third of the time and male factors about one-third of the time. If a woman keeps having miscarriages, this is also called infertility. Female infertility contributes to nearly 50 percent of all infertility cases.

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UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION IN WOMEN

Depression is a common but serious mood disorder. It reveals itself through symptoms such as hopelessness, pessimism, irritability, guilt, helplessness and decreased energy or fatigue lasting at least two weeks or longer. About twice as many women as men experience depression. Several factors may increase a woman’s risk of depression.

….FULL ARTICLE

RECOVERING FROM A HEART ATTACK

What happens now?  That is a question you could ask after surviving a heart attack.  How do you take care of yourself afterwards so that there is no repeat?  According to Family Doctor (www.familydoctor.org), a heart attack happens when part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies because it does not receive enough oxygen. The blood in the coronary arteries carries oxygen to the heart muscle. Most heart attacks occur when a blockage slows down or stops the flow of blood through these arteries.

….FULL ARTICLE

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triggered by a specific situation, such as flying or driving through tunnels or over bridges. The fear of enclosed spaces (claustrophobia) is another type of specific phobia.


Complex phobias tend to be more disabling than simple phobias. They seem to develop during adulthood and are often associated with a deep-rooted fear or anxiety about a particular situation or circumstance. The two most common complex phobias are social phobia and fear of public speaking. This is also called social anxiety disorder – the fear of social situations where you may be embarrassed or judged. If you have social phobia, you may be excessively self-conscious. Other social phobias include fear of eating or drinking in public, talking to strangers, taking exams and being called on in class.


Fear of open spaces (agoraphobia) was traditionally thought to involve a fear of public places and open spaces, but now psychologists believe agoraphobia develops as a complication of panic attacks. Afraid of having another attack, you become anxious about being in situations where escape would be difficult or help wouldn’t be immediately available.

COPING WITH FEARS AND PHOBIAS

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh


It’s important to address your phobia as soon as symptoms appear. Simple phobias can be treated through gradual exposure to the object, animal, place or situation that causes fear and anxiety. This is known as desensitization or self-exposure therapy. It is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). You could try CBT methods with the help of a professional or as part of a self-help program. Treating complex phobias often takes longer and involves talking therapies, such as counseling, psychotherapy and CBT. Medications may be used, including antidepressants, tranquilizers and beta blockers.


If your phobia doesn’t impact your life much, there is nothing to be concerned about. However, if avoidance of the object, activity or situation that triggers your phobia interferes with your normal functioning or keeps you from doing things you would otherwise enjoy, it is time to seek help.


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Almost everyone has fears, but when fears become severe, they cause anxiety and interfere with normal life. This is called phobia. A phobia is an intense fear of something that actually poses little or no real danger. People with phobias have an overwhelming need to avoid any contact with the specific cause of the anxiety or fear.


It’s not exactly known how phobias develop, but specific phobias are thought to originate in childhood, between the ages of about 4 and 8 years. Phobias can also develop in adults. If you have a phobia, you probably realize your fear is irrational, yet you still can’t control your feelings. However, phobias can be managed and cured.


 Common phobias and fears include closed-in places, heights, driving, insects, snakes and needles. Physical symptoms of a phobia include difficulty breathing, a pounding heart, chest pain or tightness, trembling, dizziness, a churning stomach, hot or cold flashes, a tingling sensation and sweating. Emotional symptoms include feeling overwhelming anxiety, panic or an intense need to escape. You may also feel detached or powerless or believe you’re going to pass out.


Phobias can be divided into two main categories. Specific or simple phobias center around a particular object, animal, situation or activity. These often develop during childhood or adolescence and may become less severe as you get older. Examples of simple phobias are the fear of heights, storms, water and the dark. Situational phobias are