HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Limit caffeine and alcohol and stay active – the more you exercise, the more regular your bowel habits will be.


Sometimes you may need help to regulate your bowel movements. Laxatives should be used with caution because they can be addictive. If your constipation persists and does not improve on its own over time, it is a good idea to see a doctor. The doctor will likely discuss your personal and family medical history, do a physical exam and perform tests to find the cause of your constipation. A colonoscopy or blood tests can be done to get further information if you think something else may be going on.


The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends kids between ages 2 and 19 years eat a daily amount of fiber that equals their age plus 5 grams. This means if your child is 2 years old, he should eat 7 grams of fiber daily.


If your child is constipated, you may want to keep a log of his bowel movements and what the stool looks like for a few weeks and then share it with the pediatrician. The AAP says you should never give your child an over-the-counter

CONSTIPATION: WHEN SHOULD YOU SEE A DOCTOR

JAMIE LOBER



Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

laxative without consulting your pediatrician first. For infants, the APP suggests trying apple or pear juice; they draw fluid to the intestines that make it easier to pass stool. Corn syrup and prunes are other commonly recommended options to ease constipation.


The good news is that even though constipation is uncomfortable and painful, it can be managed effectively. Sometimes it may even be temporary; it could be the result of a change in routine such as travel, stressful situations or weather. If you ever have an urge to go, do not ignore it.

There is no general consensus as to what normal bowel habits are. Many people believe they are constipated if they do not have one bowel movement per day, but that is not a problem as long as your personal pattern is consistent. While more women are affected than men and the incidences increase with age, it may come as a surprise to learn constipation affects 20 percent of the population.


Constipation can be mild or severe. Symptoms of constipation, according to Gastroenterology Health Partners, include passing fewer than three stools per week; straining excessively during bowel movements; having a sensation of incomplete evacuation; experiencing intense rectal or abdominal pain; passing blood in the stool; and needing to manually remove the stool.


There are different causes of constipation, but it is more a disorder of bowel function and not a structural issue with the rectum or intestines. Lexington Women’s Health named lack of sufficient water intake, insufficient fiber intake, lack of exercise and prescription or over-the-counter drugs as the main culprits. Sometimes hormonal changes can trigger constipation, but that is out of your control.


Paying closer attention to your lifestyle choices can make a big difference. Drinking six to eight glasses of water a day can be helpful, as well as adding extra fruits, vegetables and cereal to your diet for fiber.