HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

….FULL ARTICLE

10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

….FULL ARTICLE

FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Individuals who are at risk for pneumonia should discuss prevention and vaccination with their primary care physician. Vaccinations protect against certain bacterial and viral pneumonia's both in children and adults.


Sources and Resources:


Centers for Disease Control

Mayo Clinic

Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by bacteria and viruses that are present in the air we breathe. The immune system usually fights these invaders off, preventing them from infecting the lungs, but there are occasions when the germs can overpower the immune system.


Pneumonia has been known throughout human history. Hippocrates and Maimonides recognized pneumonia in the early history of medicine. Today pneumonia can be treated effectively with medications, but complications can present serious problems for vulnerable individuals. High-risk groups include infants, children, the elderly and those who are immune impaired.


Pneumonia and its symptoms can vary from mild to severe. One of the most serious complications is pleural effusion, which is the accumulation of fluid in the thin space between the layers of tissue that line the lungs and chest cavity. When this fluid accumulation becomes infected, you may need to have it drained through a chest tube or surgically removed.


Another complication involves bacteria that enters the bloodstream from the lungs. When this occurs, the infection can spread to other organs, potentially causing organ failure. With a lung abscess, pus forms in a cavity in the lung. The abscess is usually treated with antibiotics. Sometimes surgery or drainage with a long needle or tube placed into the abscess is needed to remove the puss.

COMPLICATIONS OF PNEUMONIA

When the pneumonia is severe or a person has chronic underlying lung diseases, the individual often develops breathing difficulties. This is when a ventilator becomes necessary to help the patient breathe while the infected lung heals.


Under normal circumstances, only air should enter the airways. Aspiration pneumonia occurs when a person inhales food, drink, vomitus or saliva into the lungs. It is more likely to happen if something is preventing the normal gag reflux. It can occur as a result of a brain injury, stroke, cerebral palsy, a swallowing problem or excessive use of alcohol or drugs. Some individuals, such as people with cerebral palsy, may find viruses and bacteria get into their lungs through the mouth and cause repeated incidences of aspiration pneumonia.


The epiglottis makes food travel toward the esophagus and away from the trachea. If the epiglottis doesn’t close the way it is supposed to, this causes a gag reflex, which can result in the deterioration of the epiglottis. When it does not work correctly, aspiration pneumonia can occur because food and liquid carrying bacteria enters the lungs.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller