CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE STARTING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

You hear it all the time: “Before beginning any exercise program, see your doctor.”

It’s good advice, especially if you’ve been sedentary and are now determined to get back into shape. It is important to consult a physician about your current state of health so you can be aware of possible limitations or problems that could arise while you’re working out.

….FULL ARTICLE

BREASTFEEDING GIVES BABIES THE BEST START

Breastfeeding is the best way to give your child a healthy start in life. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says human milk provides the most complete form of nutrition for infants. It is more convenient than bottle feeding because the milk is always available at the right temperature, and there are no supplies to sterilize or formulas to mix. Breast milk substitutes such as formula are harder to digest, especially for premature infants since they have an immature gut.

….FULL ARTICLE

SUMMER CAMP SEND-OFF

With summer vacation looming, parents and kids are getting ready for camp. Many camps require attendees to have a pre-participation physical to make sure the child is ready to participate in all the camp activities, including swimming and hiking. Be sure to schedule any physicals with your doctor’s office in advance to fill out any forms. The camp needs to know about any medical conditions your child may have and/or medications he may be taking. You may also need to provide immunization records.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Family Doc Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE STARTING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

You hear it all the time: “Before beginning any exercise program, see your doctor.”


It’s good advice, especially if you’ve been sedentary and are now determined to get back into shape. It is important to consult a physician about your current state of health so you can be aware of possible limitations or problems that could arise while you’re working out.


People who have heart trouble (including prior heart attack or family history of heart disease), a heart murmur and/or arthritis are strongly urged to seek the advice of their physician before becoming physically active. If you have a chronic medical condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure or risk factors such as smoking or being more than 20 pounds overweight, you need to get the go-ahead from your doctor. Other people specifically directed to get medical clearance include men aged 45 and older and women aged 55 and older.


A thorough check-up with your doctor will help you decide which exercises will benefit you most. Your doctor may recommend a stress test to determine your heart health. When your doctor records your base weight, blood pressure, heart rate and other measurements, you’ll have something you can use to track your progress and see how much you improve over time.

The Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire or PAR-Q from the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology is one way to determine if you can start increasing your activity level. It can help rule out underlying health concerns that could worsen with exercise. It consists of seven questions that you answer with either a “yes” or “no”:


1. Has your doctor ever said you have a heart condition and should only do     physical activity recommended by a doctor?

2. Do you feel pain in your chest when you do physical activity?

3. In the past month, have you had chest pain when you were not doing physical     activity?

4. Do you lose your balance because of dizziness or do you ever lose     consciousness?

5. Do you have a bone or joint problem (back, knee, hip) that could be worsened     by a change physical activity?

6. Are you currently taking medications for your blood pressure or a heart     condition?

7. Do you know any other reason you should not do physical activity?


If you answered “yes” to one or more of these questions, check with your doctor and get cleared for exercise before you start. You may be able to do any activity you want, as long as you start slowly and build up gradually. Set a goal of exercising for 30 minutes five times per week. You may have some limitations an experienced personal trainer can help you adapt to. Talk to your doctor about the kinds of activities you want to participate in and ask about intensity, duration and frequency. Once you start your program, report any problems, such as chest pain, dizziness or shortness of breath, to your doctor so he or she can help you adjust your routine accordingly.

WHITNEY ADAMS

Whitney Adams is originally from Mt. Olivet, Ky. She is married with two children and enjoys reading and cooking. Whitney received her bachelor’s degree in Nursing (RN) in 2000 from Eastern Kentucky University and has experience in a variety of nursing roles, including cardiology and pulmonary. She graduated from EKU in May 2016 with a master’s degree in nursing and is board certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner. Whitney’s interests include women’s health as well as general adult and pediatric medicine. She joined Family Practice Associates of Lexington in September 2016.

more articles by whitney adams