BATTLING BALDNESS

Some men look in the mirror and regard a receding hairline with distress, wondering if there is a cure for baldness. Currently, the only truly effective medically proven way to arrest hair loss is to lower dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels. DHT is a form of testosterone that regulates beard growth and hair loss. Higher levels of DHT produce fuller beards at the cost of male pattern baldness. Lower levels of DHT ensure a full head of hair at the cost of the inability to grow a beard.

….FULL ARTICLE

HACKING THE HUMAN BRAIN

Many people enjoy visiting various Web sites and apps that challenge the brain by luring them deeper and deeper into cyber space. Cyber addiction comes in several forms, but all impact the brain. The past two decades have acquainted many people with the concept of hacking. It is why people strive to protect their computers and smartphones from outside sources trying to break in to steal information, implant malware and preocupy their lives.

….FULL ARTICLE

HEART ATTACK AND MEN

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), more than one in three adult men has heart disease. Men around the age of 55 years are more likely than women to experience a heart attack.  Men often ignore the symptoms of a heart attack because they are uncertain about what they are feeling and don’t want to be embarrassed by a simple diagnosis, such as heartburn. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 50 percent of men who die from coronary heart disease....

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

Be bone smart and learn more about joint replacement at these organizations’ Web sites: 


American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (www.aaos.org)

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (www.aahks.org)

Arthritis is a general term for conditions that affect the joints and surrounding tissues. Joints are places in the body where bones come together. They are crucial to good health because they hold the skeleton together and support movement. Among the bone diseases humans face, bone-on-bone pain in the shoulders, knees, hips, fingers, toes or ankles makes for a very limiting journey.


The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis. OA, commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis, occurs when the natural cushioning between joints – the cartilage – wears away. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits cartilage provides. OA is a painful, degenerative disease that often involves the hips, knees, neck, lower back or small joints of the hands. It usually develops in joints that are injured by repeated overuse from performing a particular task, playing a favorite sport or carrying around excess body weight. Eventually the injury or repeated impact thins or wears away the cartilage. As a result, the bones rub together, causing a grating sensation. Joint flexibility is reduced, bony spurs develop and the joint swells.


Often the first symptom of OA is pain that worsens following exercise or immobility. Treatment usually includes a range of analgesics, topical creams or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; appropriate

BONE-ON-BONE ARTHRITIS MAKES YOU SAY: OUCH!

exercises or physical therapy; joint splinting; or joint replacement surgery for seriously damaged larger joints, such as the knee or hip.


Joint replacement surgery is performed by an orthopedic surgeon. It involves the removal of a damaged joint and the surgical replacement of arthritic or diseased bone or joint surfaces with implants that restore proper, pain-free function. All joint replacements have potential complications but patients have good reason to expect a successful outcome to their surgeries at centers specializing in joint replacement surgery. If you want to learn more about joint replacement surgery, BoneSmart (www.bonesmart.org) is dedicated to raising patient awareness about hip and knee joint replacement options.


Many other joints can be replaced surgically, including ankles, shoulders, elbows, wrists, thumbs, great toes and fingers. Some joints have both bearing surfaces replaced; others, such as the thumb or toe, might only have one surface replaced. Some implants require the use of cement, but some are specially coated to bond with the bone. Silastic finger joints may only be placed into the bone with the express intention that they will not be affixed. The flexible movement of the implant allows the fingers to move with greater freedom.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller