HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

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“A T-score of -1.0 or above is normal bone den- sity,” Patmintra explained. “Between -1.0 and -2.5 means you have low bone density or osteopenia, and -2.5 or below is a diagnosis of osteoporosis.”


Your doctor can give you tips on how to reduce your chances of breaking a bone based on your score. “Treatment guidelines for postmenopausal women and men age 50 or older indicate those with T-scores of -1.9 and above do not need to take an osteoporosis medicine,” Patmintra said. “All people with T-scores of -2.5 and below should con- sider taking an osteoporosis medicine.”


Following up with your doctor is always important. “You should perform bone mineral density testing one to two years after initiating medical therapy for osteoporosis and every two years there-after,” said Claire Gill, chief mission officer at the National Osteoporosis Foundation.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people can use the online Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX) tool to see if screening may be appropriate for them. The algorithms show the 10-year probability of fracture. Smoking, alcohol use and glucocorticoids raise the risk, and greater exposure means greater risk.

Getting preventive screenings is one of the best measures you can take to promote good general health. If you are concerned you have a certain condition because it runs in your family or age group, there may be a test for it. It’s a good idea to have a bone density test if you are a woman approaching senior age.


“A bone density test is the only test that can diagnose osteoporosis before a broken bone occurs,” said Valerie Patmintra, senior advisor of communications with the National Osteoporosis Foundation. A dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry machine (DEXA) is used to look at the amount of bone in your hip, spine and other sites on the body.


“We recommend you have a bone density test if you are a woman age 65 or older or a man age 70 or older; if you break a bone after age 50; if you are a woman of menopausal age with risk factors; if you are a postmenopausal woman under age 65 with risk factors; or if you are a man age 50 to 69 with risk factors,” Patmintra said.


You can have this test done at some medical practices, hospital radiology departments and private radiology groups. Test results are in the form of T-scores that show how much higher or lower your bone density is compared to that of a healthy 30-year-old.

BONE DENSITY SCREENINGS PROMOTE GOOD HEALTH

JAMIE LOBER

Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Jamie Lober

Remember that just because you have low bone density or osteopenia does not mean you will have osteoporosis, only that you have higher odds of developing it. If this is not a topic you have broached with your doctor, it is a good idea to bring it up at your annual physical.