FIVE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT DEPRESSION IN WOMAN

Life has numerous turns and twists. Women encounter many stages of growth and change, from puberty and menstruation to giving birth to menopause. All these rites of passage create emotional ups and downs. Because of these factors, women may have a greater susceptibility to depression. Indeed, depression occurs in women at approximately twice the rate of men.

….FULL ARTICLE

MAINTAINING MENTAL WELL-BEING IN STRESSFUL JOBS

David Brabon is a plastic surgeon. In his practice at Rockcastle Hospital and Respiratory Center in Mount Vernon, Ky. – the largest respiratory care center in the United States – he removes skin cancers from faces and hands and rebuilds shattered noses, among other tasks. He has learned to not only encourage others but to maintain his own mental well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

CALMING THE MIND THROUGH CONSCIOUS BREATHING

A calm mind is worth its weight in gold, especially in this day and age. There are more bills, emails, tweets, kids running around and relationships in need of time than ever before. Everybody needs to learn how to catch their breath and relax.  Techniques using the breath to calm the mind have been around forever. While these techniques are widely known and accessible, many people feel they don’t even have the time to learn about them, let alone develop a daily practice.

….FULL ARTICLE

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The holidays bring joy – and sadness – to many people. On the positive side, the holidays boost health for about a month, making people feel better. The holiday spirit helps people rest, relax, improve sleep patterns, reduce blood pressure, strengthen relationships and live longer. They can even work wonders for the libido.


Now, in something of a first, scientific principles have been used to explore the extent to which holidays really do make people feel better. The results of a clinical research project found up to two-thirds of the subjects studied experienced positive results in their lives during the holiday season.


What about the other third? Holiday blues can affect individuals in a number of different ways. Those who find themselves suffering back-to-work-blues after their holiday break should take heart: Scientists found the benefits of a holiday break are physical as well as psychological and can last for a month after returning to work.


Indeed, the holiday season is a time full of joy, cheer, parties and family gatherings. However, for many people, it is also a time of self-evaluation, loneliness, reflection on past failures and anxiety about an uncertain future.




HOLIDAY HEALTH & WELLNESS: BEATING THOSE HOLIDAY BLUES

Many factors can cause the holiday blues, including stress, fatigue, unrealistic expectations, over-commercialization, financial constraints and the inability to be with family and friends. The demands of shopping, parties, family reunions and houseguests also contribute to stress and tension. Individuals who do not become depressed may develop other stress responses, such as headaches, excessive drinking, overeating and difficulty sleeping. Even more individuals experience a post-holiday letdown after New Year’s Day. This can result from disappointments during the preceding weeks compounded with the excess fatigue and stress.


Here are some ways to cope with the blues that may come your way during or after the holidays:


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller