EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

….FULL ARTICLE

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT - KENTUCKY HEALTH SOLUTIONS

It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

….FULL ARTICLE

DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

neutralize the effect of decreased vision on balance, Ramulu said. One possible explanation is reduced input from the eyes weakens the VOR, which maintains the effectiveness of vestibular balance. Common degenerative pathways or lower physical activity levels might also affect balance and be especially severe among those with visual impairment.


Balance problems coupled with blurred vision can indicate several conditions, such as type 1 or 2 diabetes, stroke, pink eye (conjunctivitis), eye injury, middle ear infection, labyrinthitis (an infection and swelling in the inner ear), acoustic neuroma, retinal detachment, epilepsy or ocular migraine, which can cause temporary blindness in one eye. A balance test is recommended for symptoms of rapid involuntary eye movement, vertigo or dizziness or gait abnormalities.

Balance and equilibrium help us know where we are in the world. They are controlled by signals the eyes, the inner ear and the sensory system send to the brain. The relationship between the inner ear vestibular and visual systems begins at birth; the vestibular system is the only fully functioning system we are born with. This system guides movement, which in turn guides the development of the visual system during our first years. When we are young, movement guides vision, but once we develop the necessary visual skills, vision begins to guide movement.


Two-thirds of the brain’s electrical activity is devoted to vision. Vision is so powerful a sense that it can override information from the other senses. This can be either beneficial or detrimental. Dizziness and disequilibrium are often the result of a vestibule-ocular reflex (VOR) dysfunction (a reflex that coordinates eye and head movement) and an unstable binocular (how well the eyes work together) system, says Dr. Nathan Davis, O.D. A dysfunction in balance is common after an acquired brain injury because of a disruption in the integration of the vestibular and visual systems. This sensory incoherence is like having the sound and the picture on a TV out of sync.


Visually impaired individuals and those with uncorrected refractive error, either near- or far- sightedness, have a significantly greater risk of diminished balance with their eyes closed than those with normal

BALANCE AND VISION ARE CORRELATED

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

vision, according to research from the University of California-Davis Health System Eye Center published in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.


“Our research is the first large-scale population study to compare objective measures of physical balance across individuals with normal vision, uncorrected refractive error and the visually impaired and the first to link poor vision with diminished vestibular balance,” said Jeffrey R. Willis, an ophthalmology resident at the Eye Center and lead author of the study.


The take-away is vision may play an important role in calibrating the vestibular system to help optimize physical balance, says Pradeep Ramulu, M.D., Ph.D., with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


Willis added, “We know vision and balance are highly integrated in the brain, but we don’t fully understand the relative contributions of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular systems in maintaining balance and preventing falls, especially among the visually impaired. ” The finding that worse balance was associated with poor vision was surprising, given that eye closure would be expected to