EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT - KENTUCKY HEALTH SOLUTIONS

It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

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DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

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Watt watched a kettle boil; Roentgen fogged some photographic plates. And these people knew enough to translate ordinary happenings into something new.”

It staggers the mind to think about how many people have died throughout human history prior to the advent of antibiotics. Also known as antibacterials, these compounds either eradicate or slow disease-causing bacterial growth. Most were developed and first used between 1907 and 1985. Alfred Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich first discovered arsphenamine in 1907. It was effectively used to treat many cases of then-rampant syphilis. In 1928, Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, which, of course, has since saved millions of lives. Fleming received the Nobel Prize in 1945. Previously, Gerhard Domagk received the Nobel Prize in 1939 for developing prontosil, the first antibacterial drug.


Many discoveries and developments have followed these innovations and have saved and helped countless lives. Like many breakthroughs, however, antibiotics are a double-edged sword. When they are used too much, new strains of bacteria can develop as the old ones become resistant to and mutate outside the antibiotic scope.


It’s necessary to differentiate between diseases and illnesses caused by bacteria and those that are more viral in nature. Antibacterials are just that: They fight bacteria. If your illness is viral, your doctor will not prescribe this range of drugs because they would have no impact. Many other factors can affect antibiotics as well, such as other drugs the patient may be using, pregnancy, adverse side effects and how far the infection has progressed

ANTIBIOTICS AND YOU

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by charles sebastian

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, an associate director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says we are now moving into a “post-antibiotic” phase. He says we are quickly running out of therapies to treat infections that previously had been eminently treatable.


“There are bacteria we encounter, particularly in health-care settings, that are resistant to nearly all the antibiotics we have available,” Srinivasan said. “We are thus entering an era that people have talked about for a long time. Newspaper stories and covers of magazines have talked about ‘The end of antibiotics?’ Now I would say you can change the title to ‘The end of antibiotics, period.’”


The answer? We must be careful not to overuse antibacterials. As bacteria mutate and become less manageable and more resistant, those suffering from even the simplest infections will not have the option of treatment, given the resistance built up over time.


Not long after his discovery of penicillin, Alexander Fleming said, “For the birth of something new, there has to be a happening. Newton saw an apple fall; James