AUDIBEL PROMOTES HEARING HEALTH

According to hearing health providers, nearly one in five Americans age 12 years and older – 48 million people – experience hearing loss severe enough to hinder communication. Hearing loss is the third most prevalent age-related disability in adults age 75 years plus, following arthritis and hypertension. Only 5 percent of hearing loss in adults can be improved medically or surgically. The vast majority of Americans with hearing loss are treated with hearing aids.

….FULL ARTICLE

TAKING CARE OF YOUR AGING SKIN

As you age, you may notice wrinkles and brown spots on your skin. Aging makes skin more prone to dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it less plump and smooth. Cuts and bruises might take longer to heal. How skin ages will depend on several factors: your heredity, lifestyle, diet and other personal habits, such as smoking. Sunlight is another major cause of skin aging.

….FULL ARTICLE

A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP IS GOOD FOR SENIOR HEALTH

For some seniors,getting a good night’s sleep is an everyday challenge. Some sleep specialists recommend seniors sleep about seven and a half hours on average, while others say seniors need to get as much sleep as they always have to function at their best. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) convened experts from the fields of sleep research, anatomy and physiology as well as pediatrics, neurology and gerontology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

Watt watched a kettle boil; Roentgen fogged some photographic plates. And these people knew enough to translate ordinary happenings into something new.”

It staggers the mind to think about how many people have died throughout human history prior to the advent of antibiotics. Also known as antibacterials, these compounds either eradicate or slow disease-causing bacterial growth. Most were developed and first used between 1907 and 1985. Alfred Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich first discovered arsphenamine in 1907. It was effectively used to treat many cases of then-rampant syphilis. In 1928, Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, which, of course, has since saved millions of lives. Fleming received the Nobel Prize in 1945. Previously, Gerhard Domagk received the Nobel Prize in 1939 for developing prontosil, the first antibacterial drug.


Many discoveries and developments have followed these innovations and have saved and helped countless lives. Like many breakthroughs, however, antibiotics are a double-edged sword. When they are used too much, new strains of bacteria can develop as the old ones become resistant to and mutate outside the antibiotic scope.


It’s necessary to differentiate between diseases and illnesses caused by bacteria and those that are more viral in nature. Antibacterials are just that: They fight bacteria. If your illness is viral, your doctor will not prescribe this range of drugs because they would have no impact. Many other factors can affect antibiotics as well, such as other drugs the patient may be using, pregnancy, adverse side effects and how far the infection has progressed

ANTIBIOTICS AND YOU

CHARLES SEBASTIAN

Charles Sebastian is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by charles sebastian

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, an associate director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says we are now moving into a “post-antibiotic” phase. He says we are quickly running out of therapies to treat infections that previously had been eminently treatable.


“There are bacteria we encounter, particularly in health-care settings, that are resistant to nearly all the antibiotics we have available,” Srinivasan said. “We are thus entering an era that people have talked about for a long time. Newspaper stories and covers of magazines have talked about ‘The end of antibiotics?’ Now I would say you can change the title to ‘The end of antibiotics, period.’”


The answer? We must be careful not to overuse antibacterials. As bacteria mutate and become less manageable and more resistant, those suffering from even the simplest infections will not have the option of treatment, given the resistance built up over time.


Not long after his discovery of penicillin, Alexander Fleming said, “For the birth of something new, there has to be a happening. Newton saw an apple fall; James