VIGILANCE FOR BRAIN CANCER

Brain cancer is a very serious form of cancer. Recently, Sen. John McCain revealed he has been diagnosed with a primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) – the most aggressive type of brain tumor. GBMs originate in the brain; it does not spread there from another part of the body. The cause is not known. This tumor has no relation to melanoma, the skin cancer for which McCain was treated in the past.

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QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT CHEMOTHERAPY

Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for cancer. It kills healthy cells along with cancer cells, inflicting damage on the body and seriously compromising the immune system. Chemotherapy also kills most rapidly dividing healthy and cancer cells, but not all the cells are fast growing. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cancer cells that are slow growing and thus resistant to treatment, do not die. Chemotherapy makes these cells even more numerous as the ratio of highly malignant cells….

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RESTORING DIGNITY AND ’DOS

For many women facing cancer, the most devastating aspect is learning they may lose their hair due to chemotherapy.  “Most women tell me that as soon as they hear the oncologist say, ‘You’re going to lose your hair,’ that’s the last thing they remember hearing,” said Eric Johnson, co-owner, with his wife, Jeletta, of Hair Institute in Lexington. “They can deal with the sickness; they can deal with the treatments; but it’s the hair loss that gets them the most.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.


Nearly 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the United States are used in meat and poultry production. The vast majority are given to healthy animals to promote growth or prevent disease in unsanitary conditions. The meat and poultry production industries argue there is no harm in this practice and insist they are in compliance with that policy from the past century.


The critical question is whether antibiotic use in animals promotes the development of hard-to-treat antibiotic-resistant superbugs that make people sick. Could current usage in animals pose a serious threat to human health? The Consumers Union has concluded the threat to public health from the overuse of antibiotics in food animals is real and growing. Humans are at risk both due to the potential presence of superbugs in meat and poultry and to the general migration of

ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

superbugs into the environment, where they can transmit their genetic immunity to antibiotics to bacteria for which there are currently no immune capabilities.


Several health organizations, including the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the Infectious Disease Society of America and the World Health Organization, have called for significant reductions in the use of antibiotics for animal food production.


Sources and Resources


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller