HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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ALZHEIMERS DISEASE AND DEMENTIA:

determine exactly what is going on and design a treatment protocol to ease symptoms. To help determine whether patients have dementia, doctors talk to the patients and their close family members about recent changes in behavior, personality or memory. They may also administer a mental status exam that includes mental-skill challenges. A physical exam can flag specific types of dementia caused by vascular disease (strokes) or Parkinson’s disease.


To diagnose Alzheimer’s, doctors look for a gradual onset that is slowly worsening. Researchers have identified biological evidence of Alzheimer’s disease: neuron- destroying plaques and tangles in the brain. Until fairly recently, a conclusive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s was not possible until an autopsy was performed and the brain examined and these plaques and tangles were found. Today, a PET scan or cerebrospinal fluid sampling can show – with 95-percent accuracy – whether such plaques or tangles are present. There is, to date, no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and only a few drugs are available to briefly control symptoms of the disease. Research is ongoing.


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Dementia is a syndrome describing a wide range of symptoms that impact a person’s ability to perform everyday activities independently. These symptoms make it hard to remember, think clearly or make decisions. In simplest terms, dementia is a decline in mental function, and it is usually irreversible. The earliest stage of dementia, known as mild cognitive impairment, is considered to be forgetfulness beyond what is expected from aging.


Alzheimer’s, on the other hand, is a neurodegenerative brain disorder that causes memory problems. It is named after German physician Aloïs Alzheimer, who first described it in 1906. Alzheimer’s accounts for nearly 60 percent to 80 percent of all forms of dementia diagnosed annually. In most cases, people with Alzheimer’s at first experience memory trouble. They are able to fully function physically until the end stages of the disease. (In contrast, another type of dementia, Parkinson’s disease, leads to significant physical complications that are often present in the earlier stages of the disease, occurring even before memory issues begin to surface.) Alzheimer’s progressively and irreversibly destroys memory and thinking skills. Age, of course, is the biggest risk factor for the disease.


Dementia may actually be caused by stress, anxiety, depression, vitamin deficiency or thyroid issues, and these conditions are treatable and often reversible. Your primary care physician can perform tests to