AUDIBEL PROMOTES HEARING HEALTH

According to hearing health providers, nearly one in five Americans age 12 years and older – 48 million people – experience hearing loss severe enough to hinder communication. Hearing loss is the third most prevalent age-related disability in adults age 75 years plus, following arthritis and hypertension. Only 5 percent of hearing loss in adults can be improved medically or surgically. The vast majority of Americans with hearing loss are treated with hearing aids.

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TAKING CARE OF YOUR AGING SKIN

As you age, you may notice wrinkles and brown spots on your skin. Aging makes skin more prone to dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it less plump and smooth. Cuts and bruises might take longer to heal. How skin ages will depend on several factors: your heredity, lifestyle, diet and other personal habits, such as smoking. Sunlight is another major cause of skin aging.

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A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP IS GOOD FOR SENIOR HEALTH

For some seniors,getting a good night’s sleep is an everyday challenge. Some sleep specialists recommend seniors sleep about seven and a half hours on average, while others say seniors need to get as much sleep as they always have to function at their best. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) convened experts from the fields of sleep research, anatomy and physiology as well as pediatrics, neurology and gerontology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines.

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A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP IS GOOD FOR SENIOR HEALTH


When seniors do not experience adequate and restful sleep, their bodies fail to regenerate cells and clean the blood by circulating it through the liver. The need for good sleep patterns is as basic as the need for water and food. Senior adults are already prone to some illnesses, as well as falls, accidents and balance deficiencies, and failing to get enough sleep increases risks for all these setbacks. There is compelling research that indicates too little sleep contributes to an increased appetite and weight gain as well. From a mental health perspective, while many senior adults do struggle with depression and anxiety, they are more prone to developing these conditions if they don’t get enough sleep.


Senior health requires developing good habits that support good sleep over a lifetime. There are numerous suggestions to help seniors get enough restful sleep, and many apply to people of all ages. These include avoiding caffeine and having large meals close to bedtime. Exercise early in the day and rise and go to bed at the same time every day. Be sure to have an annual physical and wellness exam so you and your physician know you are healthy and all your medical conditions have been diagnosed and are being treated.


Sources and Resources


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller

For some seniors,getting a good night’s sleep is an everyday challenge. Some sleep specialists recommend seniors sleep about seven and a half hours on average, while others say seniors need to get as much sleep as they always have to function at their best. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) convened experts from the fields of sleep research, anatomy and physiology as well as pediatrics, neurology and gerontology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines. Their results recommend wider appropriate sleep ranges for all age groups. The results were published in Sleep Health: The Journal of the National Sleep Foundation. The panel revised the recommended sleep ranges for all six children and teenage groups as well as those for adults and seniors. For older adults, age 65 years and older, the NSF guidelines recommend a sleep range of seven to eight hours.


There are two main reasons many seniors don’t get as much restful sleep as they need. Among the challenges facing seniors is getting to sleep and staying asleep. Seniors typically take longer to fall asleep than the rest of the population and often wake up numerous times during the night. According to Aging Care (2017), studies of adults over age 65 years indicated 13 percent of men and 36 percent of women need more than 30 minutes to fall asleep. Nighttime sleep schedules may change with age, too. As we age, we tend to get less deep sleep, and it’s more common for senior adults to spread their sleep over a 24-hour period, sleeping four to five hours at night and taking additional naps during the day.