HEART DISEASE AND THE NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT

Like many Americans, do you believe heart disease affects mostly men? In fact, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.  Heart disease, according to The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women, written by members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is one of several cardiovascular diseases that affect the heart and the blood vessel system. Others include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.

….FULL ARTICLE

10 COMMON WEIGHT-LOSS MYTHS

There are so many misconceptions about weight loss and diets that it can be hard to know what to believe. Here are some common weight-loss myths.   Snacking and eating fast food are bad ideas.    Actually, eating small, healthy snacks between meals could help you eat less so you don’t overeat or binge later. Dietitians recommend having five small meals a day, instead of just three. Snacking has a bad rap because of some of the snack choices we make, such as potato chips, cookies, candy and other fattening items.

….FULL ARTICLE

FITNESS TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT

Summer is finally here, and you want to get your weight down and be in the best shape ever. This summer, make it your mission to reach your weight-loss goals – the same ones you probably set for yourself at the beginning of the year. Fortunately, it’s never too late to start down the path to health and wellness. Follow the guidelines below so you can put yourself on a fast track. Turn these tips into lifelong habits to ensure lasting success.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Design by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

at fighting inflammation. They can be purchased fresh, dried, frozen or canned. However, be sure to check the labels because many canned and dried fruits contain added sugar.


6. Oranges


If you eat just one orange a day, you will get all the vitamin C you need. This low-GI fruit also contains folate and potassium, which may help normalize blood pressure. Another great citrus fruit choice is grapefruit.


7. Guavas


These are considered a super-food. They are high in vitamins A and C and contain high amounts of dietary fiber, which is good for constipation.


Other fruits to try include jackfruit, papaya, watermelon, kiwi, pomegranate, pineapple and apples.

According to guidelines put in place by nutritionists and medical institutions, everyone needs to eat at least four to five servings of fruit daily. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says fruits are loaded with fiber, minerals and vitamins and should be part of a diabetes-friendly diet. If you have diabetes, you need to keep an eye on portion sizes and avoid fruits canned in syrups or any other type of added sugar.


The following fruits are recommended for people with diabetes:


1. Berries


According to the ADA, blueberries, strawberries and other types of berries are packed with antioxidants, fiber and vitamins; they are low-glycemic index (low-GI) fruits. You can try eating berries in a parfait, alternating layers of fruit with plain non-fat yogurt, which makes a great breakfast or dessert.


2. Pears


They are an excellent source of fiber and a good source of vitamin K. They make a wise addition to your diabetes meal plan. Store pears till they are ripe and ready to be eaten. Slice a pear and toss it into your next spinach salad.

7 GOOD FRUITS FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES

3. Apricots


This summer fruit is a wonderful part of a diabetes meal plan and a good source of fiber. Four fresh apricots equal one serving and provide more than 50 percent of your daily vitamin A requirement. Try mixing diced fresh apricots into hot or cold cereal or add some to a salad.


4. Peaches


This fruit contains vitamins A and C, fiber and potassium. They are delicious on their own or used in iced tea for a fruity twist. For a quick snack, whip up a smoothie by pureeing sliced peaches with low-fat buttermilk, crushed ice and a pinch of ginger or cinnamon.


5. Cherries


These, too, are low-GI, especially tart cherries, which are packed with antioxidants that may help fight cancer, heart disease and other diseases. Cherries are good

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh