GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.  Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue.

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A DIET FOR HEALTH & WEIGHT LOSS

Have you noticed? Look around and you’ll see a majority of Americans who are either overweight or obese. Look in supermarkets and you’ll see a plethora of food products, many of them processed or high-fat and/or sweet laden.  Consuming such a diet often leads to poor health and weight gain. It is not surprising that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. A number of diseases, including pre-diabetes, diabetes, stroke and depression, are linked to how we eat .....

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ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.

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13. Add flavor when cooking dishes by using herbs and spices such as rosemary and cloves — they give added zest to dishes.


14. Use skim milk in place of cream when cooking. Instead of chocolate chips, try using dried fruit. Use condiments such as vanilla and peppermint to enhance the flavor of various foods.


Here’s a diabetes-friendly  recipe to try:


Oven-Roasted Squash with Garlic and Parsley


•  5 pounds winter squash

•  2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided

•  1 1/2 teaspoon salt

•  1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

•  3 cloves minced garlic

•  2 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley


Toss squash with 4 teaspoons of oil, salt and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper. Spread evenly on a large baking sheet. Roast at 375 degrees, stirring occasionally until tender throughout and lightly browned, 30 to 45 minutes. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoon of oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring until fragrant but not brown, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Toss the roasted squash with garlic and parsley.


(Source: www.eatingwell.com)

Although you may be battling diabetes, you still want to have a tasty but healthy holiday. How can you plan a good diet that will not compromise your diabetes? Here are some holiday hints that are meant for the person with diabetes but are appropriate for everyone:


1.  Plan your holiday around friends and family. Catch up with loved ones you haven’t seen in a while. After dinner on Christmas Day, take a walk with nieces and nephews or play a game. Do not put the focus on food.


2.  Bring a dish to the family gathering. Make it one of your healthier choices. Offer to bring a green vegetable.


3.  Stay active. Sometimes exercise is forgotten over the holidays. Plan time into each day for exercise. Engage in physical activity with friends and family, such as participating in a charity run or walk.


4.  Drink in moderation or not at all. Holiday drinks add a significant wallop to your calorie count, so be careful.


5.  Eat something before dinner to prevent low blood sugar levels.


6.  Approach meals with mindfulness. Eat slowly and savor each bite.

14 HINTS FOR A FESTIVE HOLIDAY

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60 Plus and Health & Wellness magazines.

more articles by jean jeffers

7.  Try healthier versions of your favorite holiday fare. Use apple sauce in place of some of the sugar when baking; steam green beans; and try putting less sugar in fruit pies.


8.  If you want to nibble while preparing meals, overindulge in vegetables.


9.  Don’t pile up your plate with high-carb foods; sample only some of a few dishes. Or have a reasonable portion of your favorite and bypass the remainder. If you must try everything, put only a spoonful of each dish on your plate.


10. Watch your portion sizes, whether you’re eating in a home or a restaurant.


11. Do you want some of Grandpa’s eggnog? The American Heart Association says you can fill your glass half to three-quarters full with low-fat or skim milk and one part eggnog.


12. Pass on that huge dollop of whipped cream to avoid extra sugar.